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  • Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

    marketplace
    09/21/2017: Facebook's ad trouble, explained

    The drip-drip-drip of news about Russia and the 2016 election continues today. A week or so ago, Facebook said it sold about $100,000 worth of ads to a so-called Russian "troll farm." Today, the company announced it would show the ads to the government. Meanwhile, the company is working to improve its advertising process after ProPublica revealed users could target ads with anti-Semitic keywords. We'll start today's show by explaining all the fires Facebook is fighting. Then: all of Puerto Rico is still without power today, and it could take months to restore service. The utility was already $9 billion in debt. Plus: Google's latest hardware play.

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  • JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

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    09/20/2017: We've seen the Graham-Cassidy plan before

    Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen gave an update on the economy today, and we'll start the show with the highlights and translated Fed-speak. Then: the latest — and likely last, but who knows anymore — Senate attempt at repealing Obamacare is the Cassidy-Graham bill. It takes the money the federal government spends on Obamacare, and gives it directly to the states to do what they want with it. It's called a block grant, and it sounds simple enough, but it's not. We'll look at how they've worked in the past. Plus: Checking in with a family of Syrian refugees, one year later.

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  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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    09/19/2017: What to expect from tomorrow's Fed meeting

    The Federal Reserve has been backstopping the American economy for almost a decade with its $4 trillion pile of bonds and mortgage-backed securities it bought up during and after the financial crisis. The idea was to keep borrowing costs low and goose the whole economy. It's widely expected that the Fed's going to start unwinding its balance sheet tomorrow, letting the economy work a little more normally. So what's going to happen? Then: FEMA says fewer than 20 percent of the homes affected by Harvey carried flood insurance, and that makes recovery all the more difficult. Plus: A new study from Yale University says Americans, mostly white Americans, are just plain out of touch with how economically unequal this country is.

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  • Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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    09/18/2017: Where hate finds a home online

    Washington is getting all hot and bothered about health care again, but we're gonna keep our eye on the ball and start our show with the Fed, which is meeting this week. There's going to be a tea leaf reading, and some dot plot reading too. Then: We've been reporting a lot lately on hate groups and where they find homes online. Since Charlottesville, there's been more awareness of these groups, and they've been expelled from a lot of services, but that hasn't stopped other businesses from filling in the gap. Plus: In LA's gentrifying Boyle Heights neighborhood, mariachis struggle to pay rent near a plaza named for them.

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  • NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

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    09/15/2017: Things are happening

    Say you're a company that has data on zillions of Americans, like a hospital, or a bank, or, you know, Equifax. Consumers have very little control over those companies, besides trusting them to keep their data safe. How hard can that be? We'll look into it. Facebook is already in some hot water for selling ads to a Russian "troll farm." Now a ProPublica investigation found the site's ad-targeting tools can be used to reach racists and anti-Semites. Plus, we'll look back at all the week's business and economic news. Never a dull moment. Someone should put that on a hat or something.

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  • Win McNamee/Getty Images

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    09/14/2017: "The reason happens to be Trump"

    On Air Force One today, somewhere between D.C. and Naples, Florida, President Trump took credit for the country's economic strength and gave an update on his tax plan. We'll check a few of his claims, in particular that the plan is "revenue neutral" with faster economic growth. Then we'll head back to Florida, which is picking up the pieces after being battered by Hurricane Irma this week. But it's been especially tough for Floridians to get their claims processed — because all the insurance adjusters are still in Houston. Then: you might know Manolo Blahnik the shoes, but Blahnik is also a man, and he's the subject of a new film. We'll talk with the director. 

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    09/13/2017: "Si, se puede"

    The timeline for tax cuts and tax reform — one of the big things both Hill and White House Republicans say they want to get done this year — has been flexible, but today House Speaker Paul Ryan said we'll see an outline the week of the 25th. Now, plenty of lawmakers are starting to talk about their vision for taxes, so let's start with Ted Cruz: He wants to file on a postcard, with a flat tax and something called "full and immediate expensing." What's that mean? We'll talk about it. Then: In the wake of Harvey and Irma, the so-called catastrophic bond market's been on a wild ride. We'll talk about what that means. Plus: Dolores Huerta co-founded the United Farm Workers with Cesar Chavez in 1962, and she coined the slogan "Si, se puede." You might know it as "Yes, we can" from Obama's 2008 campaign. Carlos Santana and Peter Bratt made a documentary about Huerta and her "riches to rags" story, and we'll talk with them about it.

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  • Spencer Platt/Getty Images

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    09/12/2017: America's falling poverty rate, in context

    We say it a lot in our show: context matters. Doing the numbers doesn't do you much good without knowing the bigger picture. To wit: The official poverty rate in this country dropped a full percentage point last year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, putting 12.7 percent of Americans under the poverty line. Also, median household income rose a about 3 percent to about $59,000 a year. We'll start out today's show by talking about what that means.

    Then: We talked yesterday about all the memorials to victims of mass violence being built and financed in this country. Today, we'll take a look at what goes into maintaining them. Plus: Globalization gets a bad rap in the States, but what about emerging economies? They're seeing the benefits and starting to catch up.

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  • Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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    09/11/2017: After Irma, where do you start?

    Millions of Floridians are still out of their homes in the wake of Hurricane Irma. Much of state is without power, and early damage estimates range from $25 billion to $60 billion. We'll look at how officials start to tally that up, and the lasting problems Floridians face. Then: Since it opened in 2011, more than 30 million people have visited New York's 9/11 memorial. It's maybe the highest-profile memorial to victims of mass violence in this country, but there are plenty of others and more planned in Orlando, Charleston and elsewhere. But the process of designing and financing these memorials isn't easy. Plus, we'll talk with San Diego, California, mayor Kevin Faulconer about NAFTA as negotiations continue.

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  • NOAA GOES Project via Getty Images

    marketplace
    09/08/2017: Bracing for the storm, again

    As Hurricane Irma bears down on Florida, it seems possible that in the worst-case scenario this storm could top $1 trillion in damage, to say nothing of the lives at risk. We'll look at what insurers are watching and how it compares to Harvey, plus the way private companies mobilize to provide disaster relief. Then: Everything you need to know about the massive data breach at Equifax. Finally, as we do every week, we'll wrap up a very odd five days of news.

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  • Alex Wong/Getty Images

    marketplace
    09/07/2017: A different kind of chaos in Washington

    You could look at the deal President Donald Trump made with leading congressional Democrats yesterday as a sort of butterfly effect situation — a seemingly trivial act that massively alters the country's future. As we broadcast today, a bill just passed the Senate with both the first dose of Hurricane Harvey relief money and government funding for the next three months while raising the debt limit. Those last two were going to suck up a lot of energy later this month. The House still has to vote on it, but it's a big deal, and congressional Republicans are left trying to figure out what it all means for their economic agenda.

    Then: With the Gulf Coast picking up the pieces after Harvey, and Hurricane Irma bearing down on millions more, we'll take a look at the years-long recovery process after a natural disaster. Plus: What city will land Amazon's second headquarters?

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  • BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

    marketplace
    09/06/2017: How low can Trump's tax cuts go?

    President Trump made a big tax speech in North Dakota today. A key feature in his plan: Cutting the corporate tax rate, which currently sits at 35 percent. It's not clear how much Trump will be able to cut, however: Every percentage point cut in the corporate tax rate would cost the U.S. Treasury an estimated $100 billion over a decade. We'll talk about it, plus the latest departure from the Federal Reserve.

    Then: We're continuing our series "Trade Off" with a look at retraining. When people lose their jobs to globalization, government programs are meant to get them ready for new jobs. But reinvention is hard. Plus: Why is "'Star Wars' movie director" seemingly one of the highest-turnover jobs in the country?

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  • Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    marketplace
    09/05/2017: Dreamers aren't taking jobs

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced President Donald Trump's decision today to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, an Obama-era rule protecting undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children. Sessions argued, without evidence, that the 800,000 or so Dreamers harmed the labor force. We'll start the show today looking into that claim. Then: Congress is back to work, and topping its long list of priorities is disaster relief. The House is taking up the first bit tomorrow, and we'll talk about what that $7.8 billion will buy. Plus: We hear a lot about tax brackets, but what do you really know about them? We're here to help.

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  • Larry Buhl/ for Marketplace

    marketplace
    09/04/17: The latest fight for worker's rights

    North Korea has ratcheted up tensions again by testing what it called a hydrogen bomb on Sunday. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said he's working on plans to further sanction the country and, potentially, one of the United States' biggest trade partners: China. We'll talk with former U.S. ambassador Joe DeThomas about how that might play out. Then: Efforts to boost the minimum wage have gotten a lot of attention lately and proponents have scored some major victories. But workers rights advocates are now asking: What good is a wage boost if workers don’t know how many hours they’re working every week? Oregon is the first state to legislate predicable work schedules, and the movement is gaining traction. Plus: this Labor Day weekend, the summer movie season limped to a close with no new wide releases. So what happened? 

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  • Joe Raedle/Getty Images

    marketplace
    09/01/2017: The economics of price gouging

    The free market is cold blooded. Under normal circumstances, prices will balance out for supply and demand. Consumers adjust and the economy goes on its way. But what's going on in Houston is not normal, and price gouging is rampant. Economists will tell you those prices make sense, but making business sense is another matter. Then: The Department of Health and Human Services is cutting Obamacare advertising by $90 million. Critics say Trump is trying to sabotage his predecessor's signature legislation, but the administration insists the ads just didn't work. Speaking of ads: TV is starting to take cues from social media, with six-second ads aimed at short attention spans. Finally: Global trade always has winners and losers, and this country has always struggled with thinking about the latter. That's the focus of today's installment of our series Trade Off.

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  • Joe Raedle/Getty Images

    marketplace
    08/31/2017: Power's out

    A refrigerated storage container at the Arkema chemical plant in Crosby, Texas, exploded this morning. Well, the sheriff calls it a chemical reaction indirectly caused by flooding, which killed the power and backup power that was keeping the container cool. At any rate, it was bad, and eight more could go off. We'll start today's show by looking at the electrical grid: a piece of critical infrastructure that's very vulnerable to storms like Harvey. Then: We talked yesterday about the White House's tax plan, which, right now, doesn't exist. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin talked about it on CNBC today, and we'll break down his remarks. What you need to know about Obama's Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, before Trump potentially overturns it.

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  • JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

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    08/30/2017: The White House doesn't have a tax plan

    President Trump laid out his tax plan during a speech in Springfield, Missouri, today. Except, well, the White House has more of a sheet of bullet points than a plan. There are no details, although the president laid out four principles of tax reform, which we'll talk through at the top of the show. Then: According to FEMA, 40 percent of businesses that close during a disaster never reopen. And of those that do, nearly a quarter fail within a year. There are any number of reasons for that, but when it comes to floods, there's a certain structural problem that has to do with the National Flood Insurance Program. Plus: Will electric cars put mechanics out of business?

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  • Scott Olson/Getty Images

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    08/29/2017: After the storm clears

    It's still raining in Houston and all along the Gulf Coast. We don't quite know what it's going to look like when the water recedes, so we called Craig Fugate. He ran FEMA under President Obama and talked to us about what happens next and how displaced people can start putting their lives back together. Then: We'll look how undocumented immigrants are seeking (or even avoiding) help in Harvey's wake. Plus: Why does it seem like Congress does the same debt ceiling dance every couple years?

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  • THOMAS B. SHEA/AFP/Getty Images

    marketplace
    08/28/2017: Why Houston floods

    The thing about Hurricane Harvey is that other than there's gonna be more rain in and around Houston, there's a whole lot we don't know. We'll start with oil. Some of the biggest oil refineries in the country, not to mention the Port of Houston, are shut down right now, and it's not clear when any of that will open back up. Then we'll talk about the empty posts at key agencies responding to Harvey and the shelter strategy for people whose homes are underwater. Plus, we'll look at why Houston is especially susceptible to flooding. Believe it or not, there's other news to talk about today, too, including the Trump administration's restoration of a program that gives military gear to police and Uber's new CEO. 

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  • Mark Wilson/Getty Images

    marketplace
    08/25/2017: Five weeks to shutdown

    Remember when the news slowed down? Us too. The government has just five weeks to raise the debt limit and pass a budget, avoiding a government shutdown and potential global financial crisis. Trump and congressional leaders have few months more than that to pass tax reform, according to the latest deadline set by economic adviser Gary Cohn. We'll talk about the chances of both happening in time, plus the latest out of the Fed, during the Weekly Wrap. Then: Hurricane Harvey is a Category 3 storm as of this taping, and its eye is just off the coast of Corpus Christi, Texas. There are lives at risk, and the region is looking at billions in property damage. But the geography of the American petroleum industry means Harvey's costs will reverberate throughout the country.

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    08/24/2017: How tariffs helped along the Great Depression

    The four-letter word of global trade (so to speak) is "tariff." There are times when tariffs seem like they'd be a good thing, usually when people with power feel like the economy's not working for them. But if you bring up tariffs in polite conversation with a bunch of economists, they're gonna go right to the Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930. Perhaps the most infamous of American tariffs, it's credited by some with deepening the Great Depression. We'll talk about it as we continue our series on globalization, "Trade-off." Plus, we'll bring you the latest on the White House, Congress and the possibility of a government shutdown. Then: Taylor Swift is putting out a new single tonight, ahead of a new album in November, and you know we found the business angles.

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  • Ralph Freso/Getty Images

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    08/23/2017: The economics of Trump's rally rant

    President Trump has given three speeches in as many days this week: About Afghanistan on Monday, to the American Legion today, with a Phoenix campaign rally in between. That one was the most free-form, the most off-script and the most economic, so we'll start the show there today, with some of what the president said and the level of economic sense it makes (or didn't make). Then: College students are headed back to school or arriving on campus for the first time in the coming weeks. More of them than ever are likely going to need some kind of mental health service. We'll check in on how colleges are beefing up their counseling services in response to increasing demand. Plus: Google and Walmart ink a deal in the fight against Amazon.

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  • Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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    08/22/2017: "I woke up this morning in a bad mood and decided to kick them off the Internet."

    The CEO of an important but semiobscure technology company sent an all-staff email last week. Before Charlottesville, that wouldn't be news, but this note was a little different: "I woke up this morning in a bad mood and decided to kick them off the Internet. ... It was a decision I could make because I’m the CEO of a major Internet infrastructure company." The "them" in this case is The Daily Stormer, a white supremacist site. "Having made that decision," Matthew Prince continued, "we now need to talk about why it is so dangerous." Today, we called up Prince to do just that. Then: If chart performance and YouTube streams are any indication, and most would say they are, "Despacito" by Puerto Rican stars Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee is the song of the summer. But will its success spill over into tourism dollars for the beleaguered territory? Finally: Oregon becomes the first state add an extra tax on bikes.

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  • ROMEO GACAD/AFP/Getty Images

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    08/21/2017: Two very different kinds of war

    You can look at the costs of increasing the number of American troops in Afghanistan in a couple of ways, right? There are lives, of course, the most basic measure. The easiest way is probably in dollars and cents, billions of them. Trump makes his first prime-time address as president tonight, talking about how America will move forward in a war that's been going on since 2001. There's a stability question here, too: Despite, or maybe because of, 16 years of American and allied involvement, the Afghan economy is still in trouble. Then: The president is settling back into the White House and Congress is getting back to work, but over the recess, the media balance has shifted. Steve Bannon walked out of the White House and back into his website Breitbart. We'll talk about what that means amid a busy fall at the capital. Plus, just as the U.S. started to catch up on credit card security, scammers have moved on to a new target: your phone.

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  • Courtesy of Jason Reblando

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    08/18/2017: Life in a "New Deal Utopia."

    Steve Bannon has joined the list of recent White House departures, and with that, the prospect of a trade war with China got a little less likely. And that's good, because in spite of all the real economic competition between the world's two largest economies, they need each other. To that end: Beijing put out some new rules on overseas investments today, specifically limits on certain kinds of foreign acquisitions by Chinese companies. We'll talk about what that means. Then: During the Great Depression, the government started an experiment. It designed and built entire towns that were federally planned and subsidized. They were called Greenbelt Towns, and three of them got made before politics and economics got in the way. We'll talk with photographer Jason Reblando, who explores the Greenbelt in his new book "New Deal Utopias." Plus, as always, we'll cover a busy week in business and economic news during the Weekly Wrap.

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